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Latin America News

 

Latin America Strategy

Posted July 19, 2017


MWA Latin America Regional Mapping and Scoping

December 21, 2016 – In 2016, MWA prioritized the development of a Regional Strategy for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). To analyze where the Alliance is best placed to achieve impact in the region, two studies were conducted with representatives from each member organization. The first was a Mapping Study to assess work of MWA members in the region based on geographic spread, intervention type, main audience, key outcomes, regional investments, and overall impacts. The second study was a Scoping Study  to assess the regional WASH to determine where MWA is best placed to have collective impact. Click below to see both studies.

Situational assessment

Situational assessment annex

Summary mapping document


 

New Water Association is First for Drought-Stricken Community of Indigenous People in Colombia

Multiple Partners Join Celebration for Safe Drinking Water and Sanitation for 8,000 People in Traditional Communities of La Guajira

Maicao, Colombia, August 16, 2015 – Nearly 250 members of the traditional indigenous Wayúu people in the Colombian Department of La Guajira celebrated the official establishment of their first-ever community water association, recognized by the Colombian government as the authority for new water and sanitation services in an area where thousands have endured three years of unprecedented drought, with the last significant rainfall occurring nearly nine months ago.

More than 8,000 people in communities in this remote and dusty area along Colombia’s arid north coast have benefited from a nearly three-year-old partnership with Aguayuda, a nonprofit water, sanitation and hygiene organization based in Colombia and the United States, Coca-Cola Latin America, and The FEMSA Foundation based in Mexico. Together, these partners work under Lazos de Agua, a five-country program in Latin America coordinated by the Millennium Water Alliance funded primarily by Coca-Cola and The FEMSA Foundation. Representatives of each of these partners attended Sunday’s launch event, coming from the US, Mexico, and the Colombian capital of Bogota.

The program in La Guajira includes new and rehabilitated wells, pumps, filtration systems, windmills, solar panels, and compost latrines, along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) education led by Aguayuda with the constant involvement of the Wayúu communities, including the three in this association – Kasichi, Wayumana, and La Parcela.

Recognition by the Colombian government of the association, known as ASOAKAWAPA (Asociación de Agua de Kasichi, Wayumana y La Parcela), is the result of years of work, and signals that benefits will grow in the future with local residents taking more responsibility in partnership with government to ensure sustainable long-term service.

“We have accompanied the Wayúu communities in the whole process of creation, development and legalization of this association,” said Simón Zimmer, Program Director and co-founder of Aguayuda. “For us, it is essential to ensure the sustainability of our social investments,” said Juan Sebastián Jiménez of Coca -Cola FEMSA – Colombia. “The best way to achieve this is that communities, like the three in this association, get involved and take ownership of the project. Being empowered in this way puts their development and that of their families into their own hands, and ensures continued benefits in the future.”

The progress of the program is publicly available and can be viewed in real time via an online platform called Really Simple Reporting (RSR). The program uses an observation system in the field called “FLOW” to collect, manage, analyze and display information.

Aguayuda is a member of the Millennium Water Alliance, a consortium of 16 leading non-governmental organizations working in Latin America, Africa, and Asia to help bring safe drinking water and sanitation to millions of people in partnership with communities, governments, corporations, and foundations.

Contact:

John Sparks, MWA john.sparks@mwawater.org 202-296-1833 (US)

Bill Weaver, Aguayuda bweaver@aguayuda.org

Simón Zimmer, Aguayuda szimmer@aguayuda.org


CARE Guatemala Celebrates Progress in Another Community in Lazos de Agua

See these links for information on events recognizing World Water Day 2015:

Guatemala March 2015

http://www.care.org.gt/index.php/noticias/50-inauguracion-del-sistema-de-agua-potable-chemealon-tacana

http://www.care.org.gt/index.php/noticias/49-gran-celebracion-del-dia-mundial-del-agua-en-tajumulco-san-marcos

http://www.care.org.gt/index.php/noticias/49-gran-celebracion-del-dia-mundial-del-agua-en-tajumulco-san-marcos

Links on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Care-Guatemala/1538259016417467?ref=aymt_homepage_panel


 

CARE, Coca-Cola, FEMSA and MWA Join Community to Inaugurate New System for 2,000 People

See this new video on the inauguration event in Guatemala in December for the new safe drinking water system for two communities in the Lazos de Agua program funded by Coca-Cola Latin America, The FEMSA Foundation, and CARE-Guatemala; the impact of this program is easy to see! Lazos de Agua is a three-year WASH program working in five countries, managed by Millennium Water Alliance with six implementing members (CARE, Aguayuda, Living Water, WaterAid, Water For People, and World Vision).


 

Lazos de Agua Brings Clean Water to Seven Rural Communities in Mexico

December 23, 2014 –  In 2014, Living Water Mexico completed a total of 21 water projects, utilizing various water technologies such as elevated storage tanks, spring boxes, community cisterns, and piped water distribution systems. These 21 projects will directly benefit 9,139 beneficiaries throughout communities in Puebla and Oaxaca.

Prior to each water system implementation, LWI community engagement staff established water committees—small groups consisting of approximately five or eight volunteer community members—who were then trained on appropriate monitoring and upkeep of the planned water systems.

This table shows the progress made in 21 projects in Puebla and Oaxaca as of autumn 2014:

 

COMMUNITIES AND WATER POINTS FOR PUEBLA

COMMUNITY

WATER POINT TYPE

DIRECT BENEFICIARIES

 Tepenene

Elevated water tank

                             750

 Tepenene

Spring box

                             200

 El Potrero

Central community cistern

                             100

 Junta Auxiliar Teotimehuacan La Cantera

Spring box

                             550

 Junta Auxiliar Teotimehuacan La Cantera

Water tank

                             100

   

                         1,700

 

COMMUNITIES AND WATER POINTS FOR OAXACA

COMMUNITY

WATER POINT TYPE

DIRECT BENEFICIARIES

San Isidro Vista Hermosa

Distribution tank

                              850

Cabecera municipal y Ojo de Agua.  Cruz Nuday y Nhu-Cuá

Spring box and distribution tank

                           1,015

La Cumbre

Distribution tank

                              750

Yucuiji

Distribution tank

                              300

Rio Florido Sosola

Distribution tank

                              320

Santa Lucía Sosola

Distribution tank

                              300

San Mateo Sosola

Source protection

                              434

San Mateo Sosola

Chlorination tank

                              700

Minas Llano Verde

Distribution tank

                              300

El Progreso-El Parián-Llano Verde

Spring box

                              500

Santa María Tejotepec

Distribution tank

                              320

La Ciénega

Distribution tank

                              350

Cieneguilla

Distribution tank

                              400

Colonia Bicentenario de la Independencia

Spring box

                              450

Colonia Bicentenario de la Independencia

Spring box

                              450

   

                         7,439

In addition to the water systems, Living Water Mexico distributed 1,120 Sawyer point-of-use water filters to communities that we had previously worked with in 2013. Team members worked with the households to ensure the filters were properly installed and used.

Also during this period, the Living Water Mexico hygiene and sanitation teams continued to facilitate Community Care Groups (CCGs) in each community discussing hygiene and sanitation topics such as disease transmission, safe water transportation and storage, treatment for dehydration/diarrhea using oral rehydration solution and proper disposal of feces.

To date, there are 126 CCG volunteers in Puebla and 188 in the state of Oaxaca. The LWI hygiene team taught PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation) lessons in schools in Oaxaca and Puebla.

 LWI is one of six implementing organizations working in five countries under the Lazos de Agua program of the Millennium Water Alliance:  Aguayuda (Colombia), CARE (Guatemala), Water For People (Honduras), and LWI and World Vision both working in different areas of Mexico. The implementers matched major funding provided by  Coca-Cola Latin America and The FEMSA Foundation to create and carry out the three-year Lazos de Agua program.

– Sara Olivieri and Lael Kucera